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Arcadia, CA 91007
Live Operator: (626) 447-0035
Scheduling (626) 445-4850

Live Operator: (626) 447-0035

Scheduling (626) 445-4850

Live Operator: (626) 447-0035

Scheduling (626) 445-4850

Coronary CT Angiography
Coronary CT Angiography

Coronary CT Angiography

Coronary CTA is the only noninvasive test that can detect, quantify, and characterize atherosclerotic plaque from its early stages to calcification. It provides anatomic images of not only the vessel lumen but more importantly the vessel wall to identify atherosclerotic plaque at risk of rupture, including the potential to cause myocardial infarction (heart attack).

Coronary CT Angiography

When plaque builds up in coronary arteries, potentially affecting your heart health, a Coronary CTA may be necessary to diagnose the severity of the build up.

Coronary computed tomographic angiography (coronary CTA) is a test that radiologists use to visualize coronary arteries to avoid the use of invasive procedures. The main purpose of the coronary CTA is to detect and characterize atherosclerotic plaque so that a radiologist can interpret the findings. Best of all, the coronary CTA can accurately detect the stages of plaque from the earliest until classification.

What is Coronary CT Angiography?

A coronary CT angiography is a test performed on patients to detect atherosclerotic plaque in the coronary arteries. In opposition to using other invasive techniques, many physicians prefer to use the coronary CTA to detect whether the buildup of plaque in the arteries is life threatening.

Preparing For Coronary CT Angiography

Depending on age and heart conditions, there are a number of different preparations one must make before getting a coronary CTA. Patients who are older than 50 years old will need recent Bun and Creatinine. Also, patients with a heart rate above 65 bpm must take beta blockers the night before the test as the coronary CTA requires a heart rate of less than 65 bpm in order to work properly. Finally, any caffeine or stimulant should be avoided at all costs 24 hours before the exam so as to not affect the readings.

During and After Coronary CT Angiography

The first step of a coronary CT angiography is to lie down on a table for what is called “calcium scoring.” This test is designed to detect the calcified plaque that has built up in the arteries. The EKG leads placed on the chest area will help detect whether the plaque is too great to continue. If there is a significant amount of calcified plaque in the patient’s chest then it will be impossible to proceed with the coronary CTA.

Those who do not have a large amount of calcified plaque will begin the second part of the exam which consists of receiving a contrasting agent to get the best images of the heart. The examination will continue with x-rays being passed through your body for detection by a scanner, which is used to create an image of the plaque through the arteries.

After the exam is over, there are no additional precautions or instructions. Schedule an appointment with your physician in order to go over the findings from the report to see if further testing or treatment is necessary.