612 W. Duarte Rd., Suite 101
Arcadia, CA 91007
Live Operator: (626) 447-0035
Scheduling (626) 445-4850

Live Operator: (626) 447-0035

Scheduling (626) 445-4850

Live Operator: (626) 447-0035

Scheduling (626) 445-4850

Quantitative CT
Quantitative CT

Quantitative CT (QCT)

QCT is a CT procedure for measuring lumbar spine bone density and provides critical information needed to identify osteoporosis risk. It is a fast, effective and more specific method of monitoring osteoporosis in certain patients than DEXA.

Quantitative CT (QCT)

The strength of your bones is important. Quantitative CT evaluates bone density to detect and diagnose osteoporosis - a potentially life altering condition.

Bone strength is a fundamental part of every human’s physical health. A quantitative CT is a scan that Arcadia Radiology Medical Group performs for patients to test bone strength and other skeletal diseases that thousands of people suffer from each year. Some of these diseases, such as osteoporosis, are life altering for patients who do not get the proper treatment for their condition.

What is Quantitative CT?

Quantitative CT is a test that allows doctors to test bone density and strength in patients. It is used mostly to diagnose patients who are suffering from osteoporosis. The techniques for performing this test were developed in the late 1970’s and early 1980’s, but have since been perfected to diagnose a number of bone density problems.

Preparing for Quantitative CT

Patients who need a quantitative CT scan should prepare for a process where images are captured via x-ray. Elderly patients may need some additional help for the procedures if lying down on the table is too difficult for them.

During and After Quantitative CT

After being given the proper clothing to wear for the quantitative CT, patients will be taken to a table where they will be asked to lie down for the scan. The patient will then be moved on the table into the large tube-like area of the CT equipment where a 3-dimensional image will be created around the spine and hip. The test will create 3-D images for our radiologist to evaluate. The degeneration of bones should be visible in the image before the exam is over. Afterwards, there are no special considerations that need to be made.